Delicious fresh herbs from your garden. So easy to grow and the difference in flavour from the old dried out selections at the grocery store will have you converted! Lots more will become available later this season in time for next. Thank you for your patience!

Caribe Coriander/Cilantro (Coriandrum sativum)
Caribe Coriander/Cilantro (Coriandrum sativum)
Dense bunches of aromatic dark green leaves on long-standing, bolt-tolerant plants. A lovely cilantro with nice big meaty leaves, Caribe emphasizes bolt tolerance. It has a nice, fresh, difficult to describe, strong flavour. High yielding over an extended period of time.  Plants produce flowers that are attractive to beneficial insects. We in this part of the world tend to call the leaves cilantro and the dried seeds coriander.
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Dill (Bouquet)
Dill (Bouquet)
Dill performs best in a full sun location in moist, well-drained soil and  directly sown in the garden, because the taproot system makes it difficult to transplant successfully.  Sow the seeds in the spring one to two weeks before the last frost. Because dill reseeds readily, plants left in the garden in the fall will drop seeds that will germinate in the spring.  To ensure a fresh supply of dill leaves, make successive sowing of dill every two weeks through the growing season as plants decline soon after they start to flower (bolt). Both the foliage and seeds can be harvested for culinary purposes.  Foliage can be cut at any time and used fresh, or it can be dried for later use.  To harvest seed, allow the flowers to mature, usually 2-3 weeks after the blossoms appear.  Cut the seed heads from the plants and place them in a brown paper bag.  Hang in a cool, dry, well-ventilated place.  Seeds will fall from the seed heads and be collected in the bag.  Store in a sealed container. Dill boasts a variety of culinary uses from sauces to pickles. Great in fish dishes. Large flower heads can be dried for flower arrangements. Height 2-3 feet. Germinates at temperatures between 15 - 23C (60-75°F.) Need to be covered with soil at least as thick as the seed itself. May be slow and erratic to germinate. • Fertile, well-drained soil provides the best results • Harvest and fertilize regularly to encourage vegetative growth approx 100 seeds
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Holy Basil (Ocimum tenuiflorum)
Holy Basil (Ocimum tenuiflorum)
Holy Basil, aka tulasi or tulsi (Ocimum tenuiflorum) annual This is a plant I love having inside; when I am near it or touch it the fragrance is lovely, especially when dried. Holy basil prefers full sunlight and plenty of water. The leaves of holy basil are grey-green in color, coarse to the touch, and have rigged edges. Basil leaves are deep green and tend to be smooth with smooth edges. Both plants can grow more than two-feet tall and two-feet wide. The flower of the basil plant is generally white while the flower of holy basil is lavender in color. Use holy basil freely in your cooking and in making freshly brewed tea.
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Mrs. Burns Lemon Basil (Ocimum basilicum var. citriodora ‘Mrs. Burns’)
Mrs. Burns Lemon Basil (Ocimum basilicum var. citriodora ‘Mrs. Burns’)
(Ocimum basilicum var. citriodora 'Mrs. Burns') Lemon Basil   annual Mrs. Burns lemon basil is an heirloom cultivar of sweet basil, (Ocimum basilicum). Compared to lemon basil, (O. × citriodorum), which is a different species, Mrs. Burns has a more intense lemon flavor, the leaves are larger, and the plant itself is more robust." A Sweet and tangy lemon basil. Highly recommend if you have never tried it to be brave. I wondered what on earth to do with Lemon Basil myself until I grew it, now it is a "never be without" plant! Try stuffing a chicken with a big handful along with some garlic cloves and on roasted veggies for a fabulous treat! (see below for more info!)
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